Tag Archives: sankrit

~Breatharianism~

Breatharianism is the belief that survival without the consumption of food is possible and that prana alone can sustain one’s life. Also called inedia, a Latin word which means “fasting,” breatharianism is to live on sunlight, the source of prana, which is considered the life force by Hindu philosophy.

~Sankirtan~

Sankirtan is a form of song or chanting that praises God and is performed in a public setting. The term comes from the Sanskrit root, kirtan, which means “praising,” “celebrating” or “glorifying.” San comes from the word, samyak, which means “complete.”

Westerners have been exposed to sankirtan through the Hare Krishna movement, whose followers publicly sing the praises of Lord Krishna, often to the accompaniment of drums or other percussion instruments and sometimes with dancing. When the sankirtan takes to the streets, it is called nagara-sankirtan.

~Niranjan~

Niranjan is a Sanskrit word that has multiple meanings and uses. It means “pure,” “spotless,” “simple,” “truthful,” “great” and “without bad attributes.” It is also a name for the Supreme Being. The word is derived from the Sanskrit root words, nir, meaning “no” or “without”; and anjan, meaning “impurity,” “fear” or “lack of knowledge.” Anjan also refers to the sense of self and possession, so niranjan can mean a non-attachment to possessions and self.

As it refers to the Supreme Being, Niranjan is an incarnation or another name for Krishna and for Shiva.

~Shiksha~

Shiksha is a Sanskrit word that means “instruction,” “learning,” “lesson” and “study of skill.” It is one of the six auxiliary disciplines known as the Vedangas, which support the study of the Vedas and other Hindu scriptures.

Shiksha is the study of phonology, phonetics and pronunciation. The correct intonation, conjunction and disjunction of syllables are key components of shiksha. Shiksha also involves the study of Sanskrit letters and the way words are combined and expressed in a recitation.

~Desatita~

Desatita is a Sanskrit word that means “beyond space,” with desa meaning “space” and tita meaning “no.” However, the meaning in Sanskrit is deeper than simply “no space” or “beyond space.” More accurately, it means “limitless beyond space.”

Commonly used to describe philosophical concepts considered to be universal truths or our state of being, desatita is a way to describe the unbounded consciousness or the true Self. For example, our unbounded consciousness, when realized, is not confined by space.