Tag Archives: samadhi

~Samadhi Shrine~

A samadhi shrine is a Hindu temple memorializing the dead, which may or may not contain the body of the deceased. These temples are built to honor people who were regarded as saints or gurus in Hindu religious traditions.

While most Hindu people in India are cremated after their deaths, samadhi shrines are reserved for those who have already been cleansed by the fire of yoga. These temples also memorialize individuals who are believed to have been in the state of samadhi (a non-dualistic state of consciousness) at their time of death, such as yogis, gurus or saints.

~Savikalpa~

Savikalpa is a Sanskrit term meaning “differentiated” or “optional.” It can be used to express ideas that are varied or to distinguish types.

In Hindu and yogic philosophy, savikalpa is most commonly used to distinguish a particular type of samadhi. Savikalpa samadhi is one of several levels, or stages, of samadhi, which is a state of bliss or complete concentration obtained when the yogi has realized the nature of his/her Higher Self. Savikalpa samadhi is sometimes described as the state in which the yogi’s consciousness temporarily dissolves into Brahman. Depending on the yogic tradition, savikalpa is either the second or third highest level of samadhi.

~Samarpan~

Samarpan is a Sanskrit word that can be translated as “the ability to surrender to the divine will living in the present” or “dedication.” It can be used to refer to a particular kind of meditation, samarpan meditation, which aims to awaken kundalini energy through the process of surrender.

Samarpan is also the name of a master of neo-Advaita who was born in San Francisco and now teaches in Germany. He has written many books and held many talks on spirituality and satsang.

~Samadhi~

Samadhi is the eighth and final step on the path of yoga, as defined by Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras. The term is derived from several Sanskrit roots; sam meaning “together” or “completely,” a meaning “toward” and dhe, meaning “put.” Direct translations vary, and interpretations range from “bliss” to “liberation” and even “enlightenment.”

In Hinduism and Buddhism, samadhi is regarded as the pinnacle of all spiritual and intellectual activity, in addition to being a precondition for attaining samsara (release from the cycle of death and rebirth).

In yoga, samadhi is considered to be the state in which individual and universal consciousness unite. It is a blissful form of total meditative absorption, reached once the practitioner has moved through the preliminary steps on Patanjal’s eightfold path.

The spiritual significance of Samadhi is profound, since it encompasses self-realization and symbolizes the ultimate connection with the Divine.