Tag Archives: live

~Nischala Bhava~

Nischala bhava is a term used in Hinduism that means different things depending on the context. It is most commonly translated as “steadfastness” or “immobility” when in reference to one’s spiritual devotion and yogic practice. The nischala bhava holds firm to the motivation to reach samadhi, or true devotees to reaching the goal of Brahman states of consciousness.

Psychic Abilites {8} ~ Psychometry

Psychometry is a type of psychic power where an individual can experience visions or emotions related to a place or object just by touching it. Also called token-object reading, the psychic will usually hold an object in their hands, such as a photograph or piece of clothing, in order to summon information about the object. In addition, this type of power is sometimes used to communicate with animals, by detecting certain images or emotions.

Spiritual Healing {3} ~ Acupuncture

Traditional acupuncture is a trusted therapy based on ancient principles that have been developed, researched and refined for over 2,000 years, which aims to bring balance back to the body. It involves the insertion of very fine needles into specific points on the body to regulate the flow of ‘qi’, your body’s vital energy. For a number of lifestyle and environmental reasons, qi can become disturbed, depleted or blocked, which can result in some symptoms of pain and illness.

Treatment is aimed at the root of your condition as well as your main symptoms. This approach helps with resolving your problem and enhancing your feeling of wellbeing. You may notice other niggling problems resolve as your main health complaint improves.

What can acupuncture help with?

~Helping to support optimum fertility for both male and females
~For migraines and headaches
~During pregnancy, labour pain relief and for post natal care
~Pain relief particularly lower back pain
~Muscular skeletal problems in general such as osteoarthritis
~Help to give up smoking or compulsive eating
~Stress relief
~Anxiety and depression
~Insomnia
~Eczema and asthma
~Staying well amongst the hectic demands of modern life.

Philosophy {32} ~ Current Philosophical Camps {2} ~ Continental Philosophy

Continental Philosophy. This refers to a set of traditions of 19th and 20th century philosophy from mainland Europe. Continental philosophy includes the following movements: German idealism, phenomenology, existentialism, hermeneutics, structuralism, post-structuralism, French feminism, the critical theory of the Frankfurt School, and some other branches of Western Marxism. Continental philosophers generally reject scientism, the view that the natural sciences are the best or most accurate way of understanding all phenomena. Continental philosophers often argue that science depends upon a “pre-theoretical substrate of experience, and that scientific methods are inadequate to understand such conditions of intelligibility.” Continental philosophy usually considers the conditions of possible experience as variable: determined at least partly by factors such as context, space and time, language, culture, or history. Continental philosophy typically holds that conscious human agency can change the conditions of possible experience: “if human experience is a contingent creation, then it can be recreated in other ways.” Thus continental philosophers tend to take a strong interest in the unity of theory and practice, and tend to see their philosophical inquiries as closely related to personal, moral, or political transformation. This tendency is very clear in the Marxist tradition (“philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point, however, is to change it”), but is also central in existentialism and post-structuralism. Continental philosophy has an emphasis on metaphilosophy. In the wake of the development and success of the natural sciences, continental philosophers have often sought to redefine the method and nature of philosophy. In some cases, such as German idealism or phenomenology, this manifests as a renovation of the traditional view that philosophy is the first, foundational, a priori science. In other cases, such as hermeneutics, critical theory, or structuralism, it is held that philosophy investigates a domain that is irreducibly cultural or practical. And some continental philosophers, such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, or Derrida, doubt whether any conception of philosophy can be truly coherent.