Tag Archives: drive

Short Stories {5} ~ Dead Sea Love Intoxication With God

The Dead Sea, full of minerals and health rejuvenation, a salt lake bordered by Jordan to the east and Israel and the West Bank to the west lies within the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary, the Jordan River. Dynamo, a head strong, workaholic of a man, was taking a break from his life as a top wall street banker in New York City.

Dynamo’s sea sickness was churning up his stomach whilst sailing in the midst of the ocean. For two days he had been drifting in the salty lake not having bearings of his location. Materialism had consumed his life, but he had forgetten one thing and that was his conscience. Dynamo had focused more on bringing his top of the range sunglasses than vital nesseccities. Pleading with God, Dynamo cried out, “God, I beg you to gift me a miracle, I beg you, I thought I had all the equipment with me, I failed again, now I am drifting as my whole life has been due to my devious ways.”

Dynamo mumbled incoherently, words no one could hear except God, with a lack of food, his consciousness was sinking into a semi-conscious delusional state.

Words seemingly coming out of no where sinking and blending into his brain waves almost taking over his physical vehicle in a trance boomed out. “Recovery tells a story, the way out of self-sabotage, is self-love but you don’t need to hit rock bottom to gain self-love. You just need to stop beating yourself up mentally. You’ve been trying to find me in cocaine, a plethora of drugs, women, prostitutes, cars, material possessions, in coffee, in cigarettes, in conversations and in your work yet you have not found me yet.”

God carried on. “If you’re wondering what your purpose is here on earth, I can give you the answer. You are here to find yourself. To embrace yourself. To be yourself. And in order to do all of that, you must love yourself. You see, at some point, we all experience a pivotal moment in our lives that has such a devastating effect that we lose a sense of our own worth.

“For you,” continued God, driving Dynamo’s consciousness, “it happened quite early. When I look back now, I can see that in your soul contract you lacked self-love from around the age of ten when your father became an alcoholic and mistreated you. The years that followed were tumultuous and you stripped away your true self and became less and less ‘you’ until you reached your mid-twenties and there wasn’t much left of you – you chose to sell your soul to banking. Find compassion for yourself Dyanmo, you endured severe trauma, you were trying to find me in them.

“Prior to starting the process of self-love, I had no idea that I was sabotaging myself so badly,” Dyanmo shivered. “If you would have asked me back then if I loved myself, I would have answered no, the truth was that I was battering myself from head-to-toe every day of my life. I wasn’t physically beating myself up, but in my mind, I was tormenting myself for not feeling good enough.”

“Become the hero of your own story,” God shouted. “I AM the hero of my own story,” cried Dynamo regaining his consciousness. A sickingly euphoric feeling melted his body and mind, the shore line was in sight. Dynamo navigated his boat towards the wooden planks before him breathing a deep sigh of relief. Overwhlemed with God’s love and wisdom, he came to the realisation that life was about service and love. Not only did he quit his job that day, he used his millions to build a rehabilitation centre in Jordan for orphans, the mentally troubled and the homeless. Revelation.

Love is you, love is within you, when you start to look inside you, you will find the love you have been yearning for. Always remember that the most important relationship that you will have in your life is with yourself. You are God, yet a fractal of it – paradoxes galore.. Find him in you.

~DiosRaw 04/04/21

~Ikigai~

The Japanese island of Okinawa nicknamed the Village of Longevity has residents with the highest life expectancy in the world. They also largely share a devotion to a Japanese philosophy known as ikigai (pronounced Ick-ee-guy), translated in a simple meaning as the happiness derived from being busy at some activity that holds meaning and purpose for them.

Ogimi, the friendly village of 3,000 of the world’s longest-living people, is known for its slow pace, ocean views, community gatherings, personal vegetable gardens and residents who smile, laugh and joke incessantly. They also take great pride in living to 100 and beyond. They have fewer chronic illnesses than most people, including cancer and heart disease, and their rate of dementia is well below the global average.

Blue zones
The concept of ikigai seems to be a very attractive but the full answer to a happy and long life is probably a combination of factors that include the usual suspects: diet, movement/exercise and having friends and community. What these “blue zone” (as according to Dan Buettner, the author of Blue Zones: Lessons on Living Longer from the People Who’ve Lived the Longest) areas of longevity and happiness around the world have in common are residents who curate a simple life with few possessions, plenty of time outdoors, staying active with friends, getting enough sleep, and eating lightly and healthily.

Japanese take the concept of ikigai very close to their heart. To understand what an ikigai is you need to make three lists: your values, things you like to do, and things you are good at. The cross section of the three lists is your ikigai.

Studies show that losing one’s purpose can have a detrimental effect. Your ikigai is at the intersection of what you are good at and what you love doing.
Since the dawn of time, some humans have lusted after objects and money only to feel dissatisfaction at the relentless pursuit of it, and instead focus on something bigger than their own material wealth. This has over the years been described using many different words and concepts, but it always came down to seeking the central core of meaningfulness in life.

Ikigai is seen as the convergence of four primary elements:

~What you love (your passion)
~What the world needs (your mission)
~What you are good at (your vocation)
~What you can get paid for (your profession)

Discovering your own ikigai is said to bring fulfilment, happiness and make you live longer.

How to find your Ikigai
To find your Ikigai you need to ask yourself the following four questions:

~What do I love?
~What am I good at?
~What can I be paid for now — or something that could transform into my future hustle?
~What does the world need?

10 rules to help find your Ikigai
In their book Ikigai The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life, Hector Garcia and Francesc Miralles break down the ten rules that can help anyone find their own ikigai.

~Stay active and don’t retire
~Leave urgency behind and adopt a slower pace of life
~Only eat until you are 80 per cent full
~Surround yourself with good friends
~Get in shape through daily, gentle exercise
~Smile and acknowledge people around you
~Reconnect with the nature
~Be grateful for everything, especially things that brightens our day and makes you feel alive
~Live in the moment
~Follow your ikigai
~Follow your curiosity

When we’re children, we wander and are constantly curious about world that surrounds us. As we grow, we put ourselves in roles that we think we ought to play and restrain ourselves from being curious. The problem for millions of people is that they stop being curious about new experiences as they assume responsibilities and build routines.

We are born wild and curious. Our insatiable drive to learn, invent, explore, and study deserves to have the same status as every other drive in our lives. Fulfilment is fast becoming the main priority for most of us. Millions of people still struggle to find what they are meant to do. What excites them. What makes them lose the sense of time. What brings out the best in them.

Albert Einstein once said: “Don’t think about why you question, simply don’t stop questioning. Don’t worry about what you can’t answer, and don’t try to explain what you can’t know. Curiosity is its own reason. Aren’t you in awe when you contemplate the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure behind reality? And this is the miracle of the human mind — to use its constructions, concepts, and formulas as tools to explain what man sees, feels and touches. Try to comprehend a little more each day. Have holy curiosity.”

Source: https://japanahome.com/journal/ikigai-the-japanese-secret-to-a-long-and-a-happy-life