Tag Archives: children

Poetry By Jeff & Amber {3} ~ Remembering The Mirrored Child Within

Free and Clear

Godly pure clay they came,

shaped then crafted

by environmental ruptures,

connected to Spirit,

adjacent to our home world,

this molded fabric weaves,

through the veil of amnesia.

Cloaked

in a brocade of vibrant colors

and images

of another place and paradigm,

as we left that ruptured
line

and connection for a time.

Mirroring parental behaviour,

in the earthly realm,

observative as they are,

education brings the moment
we see

children as innately wise
and capable beings;

only then can we play along
in their world.

Fitting into God’s plan,

to be of service to the divine.

Our invitation?

Shine a light

on all that you find within,

which came prior

to the social necessities
laid bare

before you. Reconnection
with Truth

is one of the greatest gifts

we can deliver to ourselves,
and

all the rest of the fauna

and flora we find

everywhere.

Breaking the chains of illusion

necessitate the

familiarisation with the
Atma,

residing within the chambers

of the heart.

Seeded offspring from the

universal intelligence,

when you utter, leave an
impression

on the young,

allowing them to embody

and fully love

who they have become.

To see the magical in the
all

and be the teachers of the
old by

remembering what you already
know,

which lives within, and is
free and clear.

~By Jeff {JeffFlesch} & Amber {DiosRaw}

~If you’d like to collaborate, feel free to find my email on this blog’s connect page.~

Quotes {42} ~ Parents Who Realize This Acquire A Powerful Tool

“We think that children act, whereas what they mostly do is react. Parents who realize this acquire a powerful tool. By noticing their own responses to the child, rather than fixating on the child’s responses to them, they free up tremendous energy for growth.” ~ Gabor Maté, Scattered: How Attention Deficit Disorder Originates And What You Can Do About I

The Human Family Crash Course Series {4} ~ Relationships ~ How To Find Happiness As A Single Parent

Welcome fellow souls to « The Human Family Crash Course Series», a new project collaborated together by empress2inspire.blog and diosraw0.wordpress.com. Together we will be working on a different topic for each crash course; our fourth topic is focused on «Relationships.» Each topic will have eight posts with posts on Mondays and Thursdays. We hope you enjoy our series and we look forward to knowing how our posts have inspired you!

Being a single parent can be one of the most exhausting yet joyful experiences a person could have. You are burdened with the same challenges as a two-parent family—but you’re doing it alone! You get to do all of the work, yes. However, you also reap most of the rewards.

Very few of us plan to raise our children alone. Part of the challenge is the adjustment of going from a co-parenting household to shouldering the responsibilities on our own. The way most seem to handle it is by putting our own wants and needs aside and immersing ourselves in our children. While this seems altruistic, if you deprive yourself of the self-care and nurturing you need as an individual, it will eventually have a negative effect on the family as a whole.

Here’s how you can find happiness as a single parent:

Nurture yourself

Our well-being as individuals has a huge impact on our ability to be a truly focused and motivated parent, because when we don’t take care of ourselves we wind up burnt out and depleted.

Get rest

To start, you need to make sure to carve out time to rest. Try to eat nutritious meals when you can and make sure you drink lots of water during the day—as a single parent, you have to treat yourself almost like an endurance athlete!

Once the kids go to sleep, curl up with a good book, indulge in your favorite TV show or escape into a warm bath—whatever you do, don’t waste that precious downtime! Every so often, ask a friend or family member (or your ex-spouse, if possible) to watch the kids so you can have some time alone.

Build relationships

As a single parent, you often need to rely on the kindness and assistance of others. Pull in those people that you know that you can count on and ask them for help as needed. One of the best things you can do as a single parent is build relationships with other single parents so you can help each other.

Set goals and prioritize

It is much easier to accomplish a lot of tasks and to keep from feeling completely overwhelmed by it all if you’re organized. Make lists, keep a master calendar, establish plans and constantly evaluate your goals and priorities. If you need help in this area, ask people you know or professionals for guidance.

Enlist the help of your kids

Have your kids help you with age-appropriate chores. If they can wash a dish, assign them that task. If they’re too young, they can clear the dishes from the table. Teach your children that they are important and responsible members of a family. Chores are one way they can do their part.

Find positivity during tough times

Sometimes the schedule is hectic, the kids are screaming and you’re past your limit. In those moments our minds start saying, “I can’t do this,” “My life is too hard.” I know it’s hard, but see if you can flip the emotional switch and think of something positive: that you are in good health, that you manage to pay your bills each month or that you have the kindest next-door neighbor. When the kids themselves are driving you crazy, focus on the positives about them: They’re great at math, they gave you a thoughtful birthday gift or they make you smile when they smile.

~Garima {Empress2Inspire}

The Human Family Crash Course Series {4} ~ Relationships ~ How To Raise Highly Sensitive Children

Welcome fellow souls to « The Human Family Crash Course Series», a new project collaborated together by empress2inspire.blog and diosraw0.wordpress.com. Together we will be working on a different topic for each crash course; our fourth topic is focused on «Relationships.» Each topic will have eight posts with posts on Mondays and Thursdays. We hope you enjoy our series and we look forward to knowing how our posts have inspired you!

Highly sensitive children are often misunderstood. Their sensitivity is treated by the adults as “too emotional” and need to “toughen up.” This kind of response causes long lasting mental and emotional scars which in some cases affect the overall growth of the child even when they become adults. That’s why posts like these are important. We need to encourage our children to love their sensitivity from a young age.

Here are seven things we should communicate to our sensitive children.

“All of your emotions are acceptable.”
At some point in our lives, most of us have been told not to cry. While tears might be gaining an iota of societal respect, emotions such as anger, anxiety, and hurt continue to be judged as “unhealthy.” Highly sensitive children (HSCs) are wired to fully experience the entire spectrum of human emotion. When we give HSCs permission to experience their emotions without being told they’re bad, they benefit in a powerful way. Then, we can teach them tools to transform an emotion such as anger into creative fuel to do something constructive.

“It’s healthy to experience emotion about injustice.”
At an early age, HSCs need to hear that it’s okay to get upset when they see others experiencing pain. This is a compassionate response, not an overreaction. Rather than dismissing their experiences, we need to acknowledge the hurt. When the time is right, help your child take meaningful action, such as starting a fundraiser, speaking out, or making a donation to a charitable organization that fights for the cause.

“Let others know when you need alone time.”
Highly sensitive adults aren’t the only ones who need alone time. HSCs, whether they are introverts or extroverts, will need alone time after stimulating activities like attending birthday parties or play dates. Even just a normal day at school — with all its noise, activity, and socializing — can be fatiguing and overwhelming for them. Let’s teach HSCs to ask for alone time proactively. That way, it won’t come in the form of a meltdown later.

“Listen to your body.”
HSPs are highly intuitive and can naturally sense subtleties. Unfortunately, our conditioning moves us away from listening to what our bodies intuitively tell us, so we may lose this connection as we get older. That’s why we should teach sensitive children to notice how their body feels, for example, when they eat a certain food or hang out with a certain friend. Similarly, when they are overwhelmed, we can teach them to find a place in their body that feels calm (like a finger or toe). This is a powerful grounding skill HSCs can use to regulate their bodies’ responses.

“It’s okay to say no.”
Children are accustomed to hearing the word “no,” but they usually don’t get permission to use it themselves. Obviously, it’s up to parents to set their own boundaries for when “no” is acceptable. But consider asking if your child wants to go to Henry’s birthday party before simply sending the RSVP. Certainly, “no” is a delicate balancing act with children, but if encouraged mindfully, it can be an important step in learning healthy boundaries.

“Take all the time you need to process.”
Just like adult HSPs, HSCs may require extra time to process information. According to Dr. Elaine Aron in The Highly Sensitive Person, one of the four characteristics of all highly sensitive people is “depth of processing.” This means that when HSCs receive information, they think about it deeply, analyzing the issue from many different angles and connecting it to a larger picture. Depth of processing can make life rich and meaningful for HSPs, but it also slows us down. Simply being patient and allowing your child extra time to process honors this special gift.

“The world needs special people like you.”
There’s no question that our world needs more empathy, listening, and understanding. Sensitive children can also be extremely analytical and creative. Let’s show them — through our words and actions — that even though the world is challenging at times, their sensitivity is a gift that can help others in countless ways.

~Garima {Empress2Inspire}