Tag Archives: bliss

Symbols {44} ~ Double Happiness

Also known as Double Happy, this is a traditional Chinese ornament design, often used as the symbol of marriage. It is comprised of 2 characters of the Chinese alphabet which translate to ‘Joy’. Double Happy is said to attract a special relationship, romance, and bliss.

It is frequently used in branding today, on everything from jewellery to soy sauce.

~Sheshanaga~

Sheshanaga is one of the primal beings of creation according to Hindu philosophy. He is a many-headed coiled snake that constantly sings of the glories of Vishnu from his many mouths and is often depicted carrying Vishnu. Some consider Sheshanaga to be a servant of Vishnu or a manifestation of Vishnu.

The name comes from the Sanskrit shesha which means “remainder” and can be interpreted as “that which remains when all else ceases to exist.” This is because, in Hindu philosophy, when the world is destroyed, Sheshanaga remains exactly as he is.

~Aham Vimarsha~

Aham vimarsha is a Sanskrit term referring to a perfect self-consciousness or a perfect sense of “I am-ness.” Aham translates to “I am” and vimarsha means “free will” or “will-consciousness.” It can also be defined as the “spontaneous vibration of self-consciousness.”

Yogic philosophy explains that the experience of aham vimarsha encompasses simultaneously experiencing one’s own absolute freedom, infinite bliss (or ananda) and the glory of being. This is described in the scriptures in references to Shiva’s recognition, through his inherent shakti, of his own self-consciousness. Thus, aham vimarsha can be considered the essential nature of Shiva and, consequently, the absolute Self.

~Samarpan~

Samarpan is a Sanskrit word that can be translated as “the ability to surrender to the divine will living in the present” or “dedication.” It can be used to refer to a particular kind of meditation, samarpan meditation, which aims to awaken kundalini energy through the process of surrender.

Samarpan is also the name of a master of neo-Advaita who was born in San Francisco and now teaches in Germany. He has written many books and held many talks on spirituality and satsang.

~Kaivalya~

Kaivalya is a state of solitude, aloneness, isolation and detachment. The word is derived from the Sanskrit kevala, meaning “alone” or “isolated.” It is a separation of purusha (Self or Soul) from prakriti (primal matter). The state of kaivalya is the main goal of Raja yoga. It is a detachment and independence from relationships, egoism, attraction, aversion and the cycle of birth and death. One can achieve this state by performing austerities, yoga practice and discipline. One who achieves this state is called a Kevalin.

“The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali” talks about a yogi who achieved kaivalya and is independent from all bonds. He attained the state of absolute consciousness, described in the chapter titled “Samadhi Pada.”