Tag Archives: ancient

Poetry {56} ~ ETERNITY & IMMORTALITY

What is eye seen may not be the Truth

What is cannot be uttered

Trust in this empty yet pregnant comes not with seeing

Nor understanding vacant words born out of longing

The wise comprehend true knowledge

To the ignorant only but a wondering

The ego an empty husk of a shell

Some worship the consciousness

Some worship his personified forms

Yet beyond these attitubutes

Only the knower knows

Awareness will overcome illusion

Between eternity and immortality I lay.

~DiosRaw, 07/05/21

~Shiksha~

Shiksha is a Sanskrit word that means “instruction,” “learning,” “lesson” and “study of skill.” It is one of the six auxiliary disciplines known as the Vedangas, which support the study of the Vedas and other Hindu scriptures.

Shiksha is the study of phonology, phonetics and pronunciation. The correct intonation, conjunction and disjunction of syllables are key components of shiksha. Shiksha also involves the study of Sanskrit letters and the way words are combined and expressed in a recitation.

~Dharma~

Dharma is an important Hindu, Buddhist and yogic concept, referring to a law or principle which governs the universe. For an individual to live out their dharma is for them to act in accordance with this law. Dharma is considered to be one of the three jewels of Buddhism, alongside sangha and buddha, together paving the path to enlightenment. In Hinduism, it is one of the four main philosophical principles along with Artha, Kama and Moksha. It can also be understood as a law of righteousness and satya (truth), giving order to the customs, behaviours and ethics which make life possible.

The implication of dharma is that there is a right or true way for each person to carry out their life in order to serve both themselves and others. Dharma is closely related to the concepts of duty and selfless service, or seva, and is therefore a fundamental principle of yoga. Although it can be a challenging concept to grasp since it has no single-word English translation, a close adaptation is “right way of living”.

Symbols {4} ~ Spiral

The oldest symbol known to be used in spiritual practices. It reflects the universal pattern of growth and evolution and represents the goddess, the womb, fertility and life force energy. Reflected in the natural world, the Spiral is found in human physiology, plants, minerals, animals, energy patterns, weather, growth and death. It is a sacred symbol that reminds us of our evolving journey in life. When used as a personal talisman, the Spiral helps consciousness to accept the turnings and changes of life as it evolves.

Symbols {2} ~ The Flower Of Life

“This mystical symbol can be found in almost all major religions in the entire world. The Flower of Life is said to be over 6,000 years old and is composed of several concentric, equal, overlapping circles. It is said to contain vital information on the secrets of the universe and all living things. The earliest record of this symbol was said to be found on the alabaster steps that were once parts of the palace of King Ashurbanipal and has been dated to 645 BC.

Many spiritual and mystical geometric figures have been drawn from the pattern of the Flower of Life. The sacred Tree of Life in Kabbalah teachings, for instance, may be taken from the concentric patterns within the Flower of Life. Leonardo da Vinci, himself, was able to derive platonic solids and the golden ratio of phi from the Flower of Life.

It is believed that there is a secret symbol embedded within the Flower of Life. This symbol is said to hold the most important and most sacred patterns of the universe and is the harbinger of all life and existence—from molecules and atoms to planets and galaxies. Several other sacred geometry symbols that can be taken from the Flower of Life are the Tube Torus, the Egg of Life, the Tripod of Life and the Vesica Pisces, among others.”

Source: https://www.ancient-symbols.com/symbols-directory/flower-of-life.html

~Weighing The Heart Against The Feather In Ancient Egypt~

The ancient Egyptians believed that the heart recorded all of the good and bad deeds of a person’s life, and was needed for judgment in the afterlife. After a person died, the heart was weighed against the feather of Maat (goddess of truth and justice). The scales were watched by Anubis (the jackal-headed god of embalming) and the results recorded by Thoth (the ibis-headed god of writing). If a person had led a decent life, the heart balanced with the feather and the person was rendered worthy to live forever in paradise with Osiris.