Short Stories {8} ~ Jacob’s Hero’s Journey, Native American Nahajo Plains

Jacob, a young Nahajo Native American boy, sat amongst his tribal family within the community tepee. Jacob was a naturally happy child, yet was eager to discover through his curiosity the wonders of the world. He watched as the family gathered around the fire, warming the morning brisk air, gently rubbing their hands together.

Yaho, Jacob’s father, knew that strong connections between the members of the tribe were of upmost importance to develop. To build a strong group Spirit he knew Jacob had to find out what the meaning of friendship was for him to flourish in this lifetime. Yaho gazed into the embers of the fire seemingly in a trance communion with Bobo, Eagle Spirit, his main instructor from the other world. This morning, Bobo would take Jacob on a journey he would never forget.

Yaho rose from his seat, “Jacob come, we must talk.” Jacob felt reluctant to go, he was in an argument within his mind about a close friendship that was turning sour very recently, he went over to his father and sat cross legged in front of Yaho. “After yesterday my son you need to learn through your initiations how to be a hero and resolve friendship conflicts. My dear boy, you cannot fight like this, Erincho took your dream catcher then in return you too his. This behaviour is childish, a wrong and wrong does not make a right. Today, when you walk into the plains to play I want you to follow Bobo.” Jacob was rolling his eyes whist his father was speaking yet knew he had to follow his command. “I shall father,” uttered Jacob embarrassed.

Jacob got up and ran out of the tepee, he could see Erincho and his mother washing clothes, but what really caught his eye was a massive beautiful eagle, flying high, disappearing then reappearing behind the mist of low clouds. Bobo, Eagle Spirit, was his father’s spirit guide coming to land. Bobo puffed his chest out and urged Jacob to climb on his back. Jacob was excited to be upon his father’s Eagle once again. Bobo took off swiftly and flew low over the grassy plains where the buffalos were grasing.

“Jacob, you need to find your talents and channel them in the right way dear boy,” spoke Bobo. “Listen to me and you shall live an honorable life.” Jacob felt warm and cosy, safe on the back of this magnificent creature. Jacob took in his surroundings; the mountains, dusty plains and the village of Nahajo in the distance.

“Spiritual friends walk alongside each other on connected paths, friendships are often based on similarities and mutual interests. That means we share values, are at similar stages of development and each has about the same level of knowledge and experience around our mutual areas of interest,” Bobo whispered between the thin wisps of cloud with a translucency. “The soul of friendship is located in honesty, respect, sharing, and loyalty. The making and the keeping of friends over the long haul of a lifetime is a spiritual practice requiring large reserves.”

Jacob sat patiently listening to Bobo’s words. “I was silly to fight back at my best friend Erincho,” Jacob shook his head. “As soon as I return home I will put things in order.” “Your role in a spiritual friendship may shift back and forth from student to teacher to student to teacher, teach Enricho the way and he will follow,” responded Bobo.

Cruising through the sky Bobo spoke more words of wisdom. “In a spiritual friendship, we have shifting roles. Sometimes you are the teacher who deepens our mutual journey with your insights and observations. Sometimes you are the student who asks questions that make both of us stop and think. And we’re always partners on a journey, walking steadily beside each other, shining our lights on the unfolding path before us and walking alongside each other in illumined service.”

Bobo felt he had said enough for Jacob to spend the rest of his day reflecting on what his father’s friendly eagle spirit guide had said. Bobo gracefully landed by the stream bordering the tribes village, yet a snake emerged rearing it’s head. With an alarming hissing in the background, Bobo said “Tell him the secret pass code.” “What is that?” muttered Jacob. “Hint, what did your mother teach you, what is the answer of life?” Immediately Jacob couldn’t contain himself, “Love,” Jacob replied. He jumped off Bobo’s soft feathers, thanked him for his ever giving wisdom and raced down the track leading to Enricho’s tepee.

“Enricho, Enricho,” shouted Jacob loudly outside the tepee. “Jacob?” gasped Enricho. “Here is your dreamcatcher, I am sorry for retaliating, that was not the way. We learn from each other. We teach each other. We challenge each other. We encourage each other. This is the way,” explained Jacob. “Yes, you are right my friend, here is your dreamcatcher, may you have sweet dreams and sleep well tonight.” Both boys hugged and their friendship was reunited.

“At some point, our paths may separate. We usually walk alongside a spiritual friend for only a portion of our journey, taking from the experience what we need to deepen and expand our own journey and give what we’re destined to give to the other person. The length of our journey together may vary from long to short, even a momentary connection, but the impact will be profound and long-lasting,” said Jacob as he left smiling at Enricho. Both boys felt warm in their heart, both had learnt their lessons and knew what true friendship was, much more initiations lay ahead of them. Life is the teacher, Jacob is the student.

What is the Hero’s Journey? The Hero’s Journey, or the monomyth, is a common story structure shared by cultures worldwide, in which a character ventures into unknown territory to retrieve something they need. Facing conflict and adversity, the hero ultimately triumphs before returning home, transformed.

Be the hero of your own story. Jacob is a hero.

~DiosRaw 10/04/21

~Written for you little Jacob, I love you.~

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